Camille Fournier Quotes


 
Pages

Best 45 Quotes by Camille Fournier – Page 1 of 2

97 Things Every Engineering Manager Should Know Quotes

“As much as we might adore everyone on our team and want to keep them together, having a strong team means that sometimes people’s best path for success lies outside of it. It’s our job as managers to help them toward it. It’s a sign of success when people from our teams go to other teams and take on more responsibility there.”

97 Things Every Engineering Manager Should Know

“They see specialization as the opportunity to work on the most difficult and most impactful technical problems. (By contrast, a dedicated generalist is probably more motivated by working on the hardest business problems.)”

97 Things Every Engineering Manager Should Know

“Within 30 days of a new person joining my team, we take at least an hour to go through a document that contains the questions we look at here in a moment, helping me understand what makes them tick and setting expectations about their growth path over the next year.”

97 Things Every Engineering Manager Should Know

The Manager's Path Quotes

“A bunch of people who never talk to each other and are always working on independent projects are not really working as a team.”

The Manager's Path

“A complex system that works is invariably found to have evolved from a simple system that worked.”

The Manager's Path

“A very common clash occurs between people who are extremely analytically driven and those who are more creatively or intuitively focused.”

The Manager's Path

“As you become more senior, remember that your manager expects you to bring solutions, not problems.”

The Manager's Path

“As you grow more into leadership positions, people will look to you for behavioral guidance. What you want to teach them is how to focus. To that end, there are two areas I encourage you to practice modeling, right now: figuring out what’s important, and going home.”

The Manager's Path

“At their worst, alpha geeks can’t let anyone else get any glory without claiming some of it for themselves. They are the origin of any good ideas but had no part in creating the bad ideas, except that he knew they would fail. The alpha geek believes that every developer should know exactly what she knows, and if you don’t know something, she will gleefully point out your ignorance. The alpha geek can be very rigid about how things should be done and closed off to new ideas that he didn’t come up with. Alpha geeks get very threatened when people complain about systems they built or criticize their past technical decisions.”

The Manager's Path

“Autonomy, the ability to have control over some part of your work, is an important element of motivation. This is why micromanagers find it so difficult to retain great teams. When you strip creative and talented people of their autonomy, they lose motivation very quickly. There’s nothing worse than feeling like you can’t make a single decision on your own, or feeling like every single piece of work you do has to be double- and triple-checked by your manager.”

The Manager's Path

“Being an introvert is not an excuse for making no effort to treat people like real human beings, however.”

The Manager's Path

“Don’t rely exclusively on consensus or voting.”

The Manager's Path

“Even if your company doesn’t love him, you want him to love you, because he’ll go back and tell all his friends about the summer he had working for your company. That can have a big impact on your ability to hire full-time from the graduating class, and the fact that you pulled interns from that school probably indicates a serious interest in hiring new graduates full-time as well.”

The Manager's Path

“Figuring out what to do in a workplace is hard enough for experienced hires, so it’s an especially tall order for an intern.”

The Manager's Path

“Good 1-1s are not status meetings.”

The Manager's Path

“Good managers know that delivering feedback quickly is more valuable than waiting for a convenient time to say something.”

The Manager's Path

You Might Like

“If you're unwilling to adapt to the future, you'll justify the past.”


More quotes by James Clear

“However, tech leads will be working on one major new technical skill: project management. The work of breaking down a project has a lot of similarity to the work of designing systems, and learning this skill is valuable even for engineers who don’t want to manage people.”

The Manager's Path

“Humans, by and large, feel good when they set small goals and meet them regularly.”

The Manager's Path

“I feel the need to say this because I think that sometimes we give ourselves a pass at caring about our colleagues because we’re introverts, or we don’t want to make friends at work.”

The Manager's Path

“I understand that you don’t feel like that human side is all that interesting in the workplace. Being an introvert is not an excuse for making no effort to treat people like real human beings, however. The bedrock of strong teams is human connection,”

The Manager's Path

“Instead of filtering requests, they relay them to the team and then relay the team’s response back up to management. This is not a value-add role.​”

The Manager's Path

“It’s a pretty universal truth that once you get the job you thought you wanted, the enjoyment eventually fades and you find yourself looking for something else. You think you want to work for that cool startup, and you get there only to find it’s a mess. You think you want to be a manager, only to discover that the job is hard and not rewarding in the ways you expected. In all of this uncertainty, the only person you can rely on to pull through it is yourself.”

The Manager's Path

“It’s hard to accept that 'new manager' is an entry-level job with no seniority on any front, but that’s the best mindset with which to start leading.”

The Manager's Path

“It’s unlikely that you’ll get fired for being a bad mentor (unless, of course, you behave in an inappropriate manner — please don’t hit on your mentee!). For many mentors, the worst that can happen is that a) the mentee is a drain on their time and they get less coding work done, or b) they do such a poor job that someone whom the organization might otherwise want to hire/keep around has a bad experience and doesn’t join the organization, or opts to leave the organization sooner than she otherwise might. Sadly, the second outcome is far more likely than the first.”

The Manager's Path

“Knowing yourself is step one. Step two is going after what you want.”

The Manager's Path

“Listening is the first and most basic skill of managing people.”

The Manager's Path

“Managers who care about you as a person, and who actively work to help you grow in your career.”

The Manager's Path

“Many pieces of management advice tell new managers that part of their job, if they are effective, is to be a shield (or, less politely, a 'bullsh*t umbrella'). They should help their team focus on what they need to get done without being distracted by the wider drama, politics, and changes happening in the company around them.”

The Manager's Path

“My job as tech lead was to continue to write code, but with the added responsibilities of representing the group to management, vetting our plans for feature delivery, and dealing with a lot of the details of the project management process.”

The Manager's Path

“Regular 1-1s are like oil changes; if you skip them, plan to get stranded on the side of the highway at the worst possible time.”

The Manager's Path

You Might Like

“Education is one of the industry categories with a big potential for AI. And Coursera is already doing some of this work.”


More quotes by Andrew Ng

 
Pages