Devon Price Quotes



Best 17 Laziness Does Not Exist Quotes by Devon Price

Laziness Does Not Exist Quotes

“At some point, even the most voracious of readers needs to pull the plug and stop the constant drip of facts, figures, and meaningless Internet fights.”

Laziness Does Not Exist

“Clearly a very lazy person, someone who just needed to work harder to bring themselves out of poverty.”

Laziness Does Not Exist

“Here are some indications that you may still be associating productivity with goodness:

- When you get less done during the day than you anticipated, you feel guilty.
- You have trouble enjoying your free time.
- You believe you have to 'earn' the right to a vacation or break.
- You take care of your health only in order to remain productive.
- Having nothing to do makes you feel 'useless'.
- You find the idea of growing old or becoming disabled to be incredibly depressing.
- When you say no to someone, you feel compelled to say yes to something else to 'make up' for it.”

Laziness Does Not Exist

“I found that by advocating for our right to be 'lazy', we can carve out space in our lives for play, relaxation, and recovery.

I also discovered the immense relief that comes when we cease tying our self-image to how many items we check off our to-do lists.”

Laziness Does Not Exist

“I realized then that my struggles were part of a much bigger social epidemic, something I’m calling the Laziness Lie. The Laziness Lie is a deep-seated, culturally held belief system that leads many of us to believe the following:

Deep down I’m lazy and worthless. I must work incredibly hard, all the time, to overcome my inner laziness. My worth is earned through my productivity. Work is the center of life. Anyone who isn’t accomplished and driven is immoral.”

Laziness Does Not Exist

“If you're entitled to moments of rest, of imperfection, of laziness and sloth, then so are homeless people, and people with depression, and people who are addicted to drugs. If your life has value no matter how productive you are, so does every other human life.”

Laziness Does Not Exist

“The Laziness Lie has three main tenets. They are: Your worth is your productivity. You cannot trust your own feelings and limits. There is always more you could be doing.”

Laziness Does Not Exist

“The Laziness Lie is a belief system that says hard work is moraly superior to relaxation, that people who aren't productive have less innate value than productive people.

It's an unspoken yet commonly held set of ideas and values. It affects how we work, how we set limits in our relationships, our views on what life is supposed to be about.”

Laziness Does Not Exist

“The Laziness Lie is a deep-seated, culturally held belief system that leads many of us to believe the following: Deep down I’m lazy and worthless. I must work incredibly hard, all the time, to overcome my inner laziness. My worth is earned through my productivity. Work is the center of life. Anyone who isn’t accomplished and driven is immoral.”

Laziness Does Not Exist

“The Laziness Lie is a deep-seated, culturally held belief system that leads many of us to believe the following: Deep down I’m lazy and worthless. I must work incredibly hard, all the time, to overcome my inner laziness. My worth is earned through my productivity. Work is the center of life. Anyone who isn’t accomplished and driven is immoral. The Laziness Lie is the source of the guilty feeling that we are not “doing enough”; it’s also the force that compels us to work ourselves to sickness.”

Laziness Does Not Exist

“These types of people often try to cram every waking moment with activity. After a long day at work, they try to teach themselves Spanish on the Duolingo app on their phone, for example, or they try to learn how to code in Python on sites like Code Academy.”

Laziness Does Not Exist

“Wasting time is a basic human need. Once we accept that, we can stop fearing our inner 'laziness' and begin to build healthy, happy, well-balanced lives.”

Laziness Does Not Exist

“We have all been lied to about laziness. Our culture has us convinced that success requires nothing more than willpower, that pushing ourselves to the point of collapse is morally superior to taking it easy. We've been taught that any limitation is a sign of laziness, and therefore undeserving of love or comfort.”

Laziness Does Not Exist

“We live in a world where hard work is rewarded and having needs and limitations is seen as a source of shame. It's no wonder so many of us are constantly overexerting ourselves, saying yes out of fear of how we'll be perceived for saying no.”

Laziness Does Not Exist

“When employees are unable to slack off using the Internet, they find other ways to mentally escape. They 'waste' time making cups of tea, sharpening pencils, or popping into coworkers’ offices to say hello.”

Laziness Does Not Exist

“When you lose power over your own life, you don’t have much reason to stay energized and motivated. So, you protect yourself emotionally by checking out and giving up.”

Laziness Does Not Exist

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“Like similar poles,
we keep pushing
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too close.”


More quotes by Louise Kaufmann

“Work is the center of life. Anyone who isn’t accomplished and driven is immoral. The Laziness Lie is the source of the guilty feeling that we are not 'doing enough'; it’s also the force that compels us to work ourselves to sickness.”

Laziness Does Not Exist