Kate Raworth Quotes

Who the Heck is Kate Raworth?

Kate Raworth is an English economist working for the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge.

Raworth is known for her work on 'doughnut economics', which she understands as an economic model that balances between essential human needs and planetary boundaries.

Her book 'Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist' made Raworth a best selling author.

Born January 01, 1970

Books by Kate Raworth


Best 37 Quotes by Kate Raworth

“Calling all economic rebels: humanity's future depends on you. Yes, really. Because, unless we transform the economic and public debate, we stand very little chance indeed of thriving in this century.”

Kate Raworth

“Inequality is not an economic necessity: it is a design failure.”

Kate Raworth

“What should economies be aimed at? For over half a century, the goal has been economic growth – but while the global economy has quadrupled in size since the 1970s, human deprivation persists, environmental degradation is deepening, and inequality is at the heart of it all. It’s clear that we need richer concepts and measures of what our economies should be aimed at.”

Kate Raworth

"A New Economics" Quotes

“Today we have economies that need to grow, whether or not they make us thrive. What we need are economies that make us thrive, whether or not they grow.”

Kate Raworth
A New Economics

"Doughnut Economics" Quotes

“A business that is built on a living purpose may have strong foundations, but without a source of finance that is aligned with its values it is unlikely to survive and thrive.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“Adam Smith believed that every economy would eventually reach what he called a ‘stationary state’ with its ‘full compliment of riches’ ultimately being determined by ‘the richness of its soil, climate and situation’.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“Adam Smith was right when he said that we love to truck, barter and exchange, but he was also right that we and our societies flourish best when we display our ‘humanity, justice, generosity and public spirit’.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“Back in Ancient Greece, when Xenophon first came up with the term economics, he described the practice of household management as an art. Following his lead, Aristotle distinguished economics from chrematistics, the art of acquiring wealth—in a distinction that seems to have been all but lost today.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“Don’t wait for economic growth to reduce inequality—because it won’t. Instead, create an economy that is distributive by design.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“Economics is not a matter of discovering laws: it is essentially a question of design.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“Economics is the mother tongue of public policy.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“Effective systems tend to have three properties – healthy hierarchy, self-organisation and resilience – and so should be stewarded to enable these characteristics to emerge.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“For over 70 years economics has been fixated on GDP, or national output, as its primary measure of progress. That fixation has been used to justify extreme inequalities of income and wealth coupled with unprecedented destruction of the living world. For the twenty-first century a far bigger goal is needed: meeting the human rights of every person within the means of our life-giving planet.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“For the twenty-first century, a far bigger goal is needed: meeting the human rights of every person within the means of our life-giving planet.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“Governments have historically opted to tax what they could, rather than what they should, and it shows.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“Here’s the conundrum: No country has ever ended human deprivation without a growing economy. And no country has ever ended ecological degradation with one.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“Homo sapiens, it turns out, is the most cooperative species on the planet, outperforming ants, hyenas, and even the naked mole-rat when it comes to living alongside those who are beyond our next of kin.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“In contrast to Pareto’s pyramid and Kuznets’s rollercoaster ride, its essence is a distributed network whose many nodes, larger and smaller, are interconnected in a web of flows.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“In the twentieth century, economics lost the desire to articulate its goals: in their absence, the economic nest got hijacked by the cuckoo goal of GDP growth.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“In the words of the systems thinker John Sterman, 'The most important assumptions of a model are not in the equations, but what's not in them; not in the documentation, but unstated; not in the variables on the computer screen, but in the blank spaces around them'.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“It’s time to draw the economy anew, embedding it within society and within nature, and powered by the sun. This new depiction invites new narratives—about the power of the market, the partnership of the state, the core role of the household, and the creativity of the commons.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

Products by Kate Raworth

“People’s sense of reciprocity appears to co-evolve with their economy’s structure: a fascinating finding with important implications for those aiming to rebalance the roles of the household, market, commons and state in any society.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“Pre-analytic vision. Worldview. Paradigm. Frame. These are cousin concepts. What matters more than the one you choose to use is to realize that you have one in the first place, because then you have the power to question and change it.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“Regenerative industrial design can only be fully realised if it is underpinned by regenerative economic design.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“Rethinking economics is not about finding the correct one (because it doesn’t exist); it’s about choosing or creating one that best serves our purpose—reflecting the context we face, values we hold, and the aims we have. As humanity’s context, values and aims continually evolve, so too should the way that we envision the economy.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“Thanks to the scale of our impact, we have now left behind the Holocene and entered uncharted territory, known as the Anthropocene: the first geological epoch that is shaped by human activity.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“The challenge now is to create economies – local to global – that help to bring all of humanity into the Doughnut’s safe and just space. Instead of pursuing ever-increasing GDP, it is time to discover how to thrive in balance.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“The Doughnut’s inner ring—its social foundation—sets out the basics of life on which no one should be left falling short.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“The essence of that industrial system is the cradle-to-grave manufacturing supply chain of take, make, use, lose: extract Earth’s minerals, metals, biomass and fossil fuels; manufacture them into products; sell those on to consumers who — probably sooner rather than later — will throw them ‘away’.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“Today’s economy is divisive and degenerative by default. Tomorrow’s economy must be distributive and regenerative by design.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“Toddlers just 14 months old will help others by handing them out-of-reach objects, and children as young as three will share their treats with others.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“We are born pattern-spotters, seeing faces in the clouds, ghosts in the shadows, and mythical beasts in the stars.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“We have an economy that needs to grow, whether or not it makes us thrive. We need an economy that makes us thrive, whether or not it grows.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“We would have to be crazy to kick ourselves out of the Holocene’s sweet spot, but that is, of course, exactly what we have been doing.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“What if we started economics not with its long-established theories but with humanity’s long-term goals, and then sought out the economic thinking that would enable us to achieve them. I tried to draw a picture of those goals and, ridiculous though it sounds, it came out looking like a doughnut...”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“Words are processed by our short-term memory where we can only retain about seven bits of information. Images, on the other hand, go directly into long-term memory where they are indelibly etched.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics

“Worldwide, one person in nine does not have enough to eat.”

Kate Raworth
Doughnut Economics