William George Jordan Quotes



Best 10 The Majesty of Calmness Quotes by William George Jordan

The Majesty of Calmness Quotes

“Education, in its highest sense, is conscious training of mind or body to act unconsciously. It is conscious formation of mental habits, not mere acquisition of information.”

The Majesty of Calmness

“Every man has an atmosphere which is affecting every other.”

The Majesty of Calmness

“Everything that is great in life is the product of slow growth; the newer, and greater, and higher, and nobler the work, the slower is its growth, the surer is its lasting success. Mushrooms attain their full power in a night; oaks require decades. A fad lives its life in a few weeks; a philosophy lives through generations and centuries.”

The Majesty of Calmness

“Happiness consists not of having, but of being; not of possessing, but of enjoying. It is the warm glow of a heart at peace with itself.”

The Majesty of Calmness

“Into the hands of every individual is given a marvelous power for good or evil---the silent, unconscious, unseen influence of his life. This is simply the radiation of what man really is, not what he pretends to be.”

The Majesty of Calmness

“Life is not something to be lived through: it is something to be lived up to. It is a privilege, not a penal servitude of so many decades on earth.”

The Majesty of Calmness

“Nature is very un-American. Nature never hurries.”

The Majesty of Calmness

“Self-confidence without self-reliance is as useless as a cooking recipe without food. Self-confidence sees the possibilities of the individual; self-reliance realizes them. Self-confidence sees the angel in the unhewn block of marble; self-reliance carves it out for oneself.”

The Majesty of Calmness

“There are times when a man should be content with what he has but never with what he is.”

The Majesty of Calmness

“Unhappiness is hunger to get; happiness is hunger to give.”

The Majesty of Calmness

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“The standard of living attained in the most advanced industrial areas is not a suitable model of development if the aim is pacification. In view of what this standard has made of Man and Nature, the question must again be asked whether it is worth the sacrifices and the victims made in its defense.

The question has ceased to be irresponsible since the “affluent society” has become a society of permanent mobilization against the risk of annihilation, and since the sale of its goods has been accompanied by moronization, the perpetuation of toil, and the promotion of frustration. Under these circumstances, liberation from the affluent society does not mean return to healthy and robust poverty, moral cleanliness, and simplicity.

On the contrary, the elimination of profitable waste would increase the social wealth available for distribution, and the end of permanent mobilization would reduce the social need for the denial of satisfactions that are the individual’s own—denials which now find their compensation in the cult of fitness, strength, and regularity.”


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